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Breaking Down Your Brake Rotors

Some people are full out DIYers and if you are one of them then you probably like the idea of working on your car, too. Of course, that is a completely foreign land to many people, even those who really enjoy the DIY lifestyle.

And when it comes to doing your car maintenance you will undoubtedly have to learn how to work on your CrossDrilledRotors.ca brake parts. This does not just mean simply replacing your brake pads but can also include checking and replacing your brake rotors, too.  And, with that, here are the different types of brake rotors.

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SOLID SURFACE BRAKE ROTORS

Also known as smooth surface brake rotors, solid surface brake rotors are typically made of solid cast iron.  Essentially, this is the modern industry brake rotor standard on all original, non-performance vehicles.  Basically, if you were to buy a car from a dealership and did not choose a “performance” option, your vehicle will come equipped with solid surface brake rotors.

SLOTTED SURFACE BRAKE ROTORS

As you can imagine these are somewhat similar to solid surface brake rotors with the only difference being that the surface is slotted. The slotting provides more friction—and therefore more stopping power—than traditional solid surface brake rotors. You will find these brake rotors more commonly in competition vehicles and in some vehicles that haul heavy loads.  The added friction, obviously, makes it easier to stop with a load that is heavier than the average vehicle. Of course, it is important to remember that this higher friction value comes at the expense of brake pad life.

CROSS-DRILLED SURFACE BRAKE ROTORS

If you are following along, this type of brake rotor has a cross-drilled surface. That means it has improved surface area which provides more friction and, therefore, more stopping power.  This type of brake rotor typically results in uneven wear and that can put your brakes at higher risk for stress cracks, particularly in high performance racing conditions.  With that in mind, this brake rotor best serves vehicles consistently driven in rainy conditions.

CROSS-DRILLED and SLOTTED SURFACE BRAKE ROTORS

Also known as Combination Brake Rotors, this type of brake rotor provides the best of all benefits from each of the brake rotor type listed previously.

SLOTTED and DIMPLED SURFACE BRAKE ROTORS

While they might be considered the “best-looking” rotors, they also have the best performance, perhaps, because the combination adds even better friction and stress-crack resistance.

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